Home > Dell, OME > HOWTO: First Time Setup of Dell OME Open Manage Essentials (OME) v1.2

HOWTO: First Time Setup of Dell OME Open Manage Essentials (OME) v1.2

1) Launch Dell Open Manage Essentials from the Desktop:

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2) The startup splash screen will load.  You will likely be prompted for credentials, and should use your Domain Admin account.

3) The initial screen will show new logs and alerts, which are largely because we’ve installed the program for the first time.

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Click CLEAR.

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Click the X in the upper right corner.

4) You are now at the HOME -> DASHBOARD console:

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As you can see, there isn’t much here.

5) Click on the PREFERENCES tab:

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We’re going to keep all these default settings.  You MAY want to change the CONSOLE SESSION TIMEOUT to suit your preferences.

6) Click on the EMAIL SETTINGS sub tab.

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Add an SMTP server name and credentials if required, and click APPLY.

7) Click on WARRANTY NOTIFICATION SETTINGS:

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Enable the WARRANTY EMAIL NOTIFICATIONS.  Set the TO and FROM e-mails as appropriate.  Check the box for INCLUDE DEVICES WITH EXPIRED WARRANTIES and change it from 7 to 30 days.  Click APPLY.

8) Click on the MANAGE tab:

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Click on the DISCOVERY AND INVENTORY sub tab.

9) Click on ADD DISCOVERY RANGE:

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Add an IP range such as “10.0.0.1-254” with a mask of 255.255.255.0 and click ADD.

NOTE: A suggested alternative, to not pick up workstations, printers, etc, is to add devices by hostname.  For example, we know that:

NW-ESXI01

NW-ESXI01-IDRAC

NW-ESXI02

NW-ESXI02-IDRAC

NW-ESXI03

NW-ESXI03-IDRAC

Are all likely Dell servers.  For my example, I’ll assume those were searched for.

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On the ICMP Configuration screen, I recommend changing the defaults from 1000MS and 1 attempt to 3000 and 3.  Click NEXT.

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On the SNMP Configuration screen, enter the READ community name and click NEXT.

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On the WMI Configuration screen, we’re going to omit this for now.  Click NEXT.

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On the Storage Configuration screen, we also omit this as we use no such devices.  Click NEXT.

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On the WS-Man Configuration screen, we enter the ESXi root user and password and check the boxes.  There is some later configuration of ESXi hosts to do yet.  Click NEXT.

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On the SSH Configuration screen, we also omit this as we have no linux servers.  Click NEXT.

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On the IPMI Configuration screen, enter an IPMI (iDRAC) username and password.  Click NEXT.

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On the Discovery Range Action, accept the default of PERFORM BOTH DISCOVERY AND INVENTORY.  Click NEXT.

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Review the SUMMARY screen, and click FINISH.

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This will take some time to run.

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Once complete, if you click on the range, you’re going to see details on what it found.

10) Click on MANAGE on the top menu, and then DEVICES on the bottom:

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Here we can see the devices detected.  The “Unknown” we’ll largely ignore, this is going to be workstations and other devices and we will eventually purge them out of here.

Let’s expand the VMware ESX Servers and then pick one of the hosts as shown, and then expand it.  As you can see, we get a summary of the NIC information, the VM’s on the host, etc.  We are not seeing ALL of the information yet, because the ESXi hosts have not been configured for use with OME.  We’ll handle that in a bit.

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If you click on the section with GREEN CHECK BOXES, the RAC, you’ll see each of the iDRAC’s listed.  This will give considerable detail about the machine, as well as things like Service Tag, Express Service Code, etc.

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If for any reason, over time you notice that your hosts seem to change their name all on their own, double check that the “reverse DNS” or PTR record is accurate, does not have duplicates, and is not reused from a previous server.  Often we will manually create A records but not the associated PTR’s.  Good System Monitoring is only as good as Good System Maintenance is.

If we click on MANAGE -> ALERTS:

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We can very quickly see why we’re going to want to omit the workstations from our scans, as well as VM servers, etc.  This is one reason why often a Discovery and Inventory scan is best done by individual host name rather than scanning the network.  At a later date, we’ll configure the alerts section to e-mail on up/down/etc.

11) So let’s make those ESXi hosts detectable.  Click on TUTORIALS:

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And then select the CONFIGURING ESXi 4.x and 5.0 for DISCOVERY AND INVENTORY.  Most of these steps are already done, as we already apply the OMSA VIB to our servers by default.  We also have standardized the enabling and setting of SNMP – but NOT the sending of traps to the OME server.

12) Click on MANAGE -> SYSTEM UPDATE:

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Here we can perform updates to the system, for items such as BIOS, Firmware, Drivers, etc.  In the upper left, we can see that a “NEWER CATALOG VERSION IS AVAILABLE”.  Click GET THE LATEST.

The lower right hand TASK EXECUTION HISTORY will show:

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And then the upper left will change to show:

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We now have the latest catalog.

This largely covers first time setup of the product.  It takes a while to get systems inventoried and status’ updated.  There will be yet another HOWTO in this series to cover how to effectively use the product, which I will cover once I deal with with the IP Reverse DNS issues identified in Step 10.

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Categories: Dell, OME
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